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A Bit about the OTHER Xerography

2012 July 24
by R.L. Gibson

Learn more about Xerographist RL Gibson!Xerography is a method of artwork that is not very well-known, but the name is taken from a process that is fundamental to the media.   That process is an interesting one, and here is a little bit about the way the xerography itself works.  The essence of xerography is that it is a way of photocopying that can create an interesting variety of images.

First, a document, photo or object will be chosen and placed onto a surface within the copier.  The process of simple xerography begins with an electrostatic charge that is distributed all over the surface of a copier drum.  This charge is -600 volts and it spreads equally around due to a discharge coming from a corona unit.

Once this has happened, the process has begun and the next step is ready to take place.  Only those who have come into contact with xerography or studied the intricate workings of photocopiers will know a good amount about how this process works.  So if you are not very clued-up, preferring to spend your time taking part in other hobbies such as playing golf or PartyPoker, then here is a quick description of what happens next:

Learn more about Xerographist RL Gibson! The flash lamps will illuminate the document or object, so that its image is projected onto the moving surface of the drum. This image is then projected onto a photoconductor and made either smaller or larger, depending on the settings.

The image is then developed and transferred onto paper. The toner that is used in this process is fused to the paper using heat or pressure, so that the image then becomes visible. Of course when this process is made into an art form, there are many variations to the whole technique.  Artists can customize many different things in order to create the desired effect.  It is a very unique way of creating art.

One Response
  1. Salle Cher permalink
    July 13, 2014

    I LIKE THIS ARTICLE. I MAY PRACTICE THIS & SEE THE MAGIC MYSELF.

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